The Bored Girl's Kitchen











{April 17, 2014}   Homemade Calzones

Verdict: Om nom, nom nom nom.

Pizza is one of those dishes that my husband and I both love. It’s a favorite for him when he doesn’t feel like making a full meal because it’s quick and easy, especially when ordered. I like it for, well, most of the same reasons. We always end up compromising on what we get because I alwaya want a ‘fancier’ pizza than he does, so personal pizzas were a no brainer that I brain farted on until very recently. After talking with one of the ladies at work about how she threw together a calzone for her family in a reasonable amount of time, I decided that hey, I can do this too!

What you’ll need to make this: realistically anything that sounds good on a pizza. I went with

– Pizza dough
– Pizza sauce
– Cheese (I used mozzarella, sharp cheddar, and feta)
– Ground beef and pepperoni for my meat
– Mushrooms and garlic for my veggies

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Step 1: Brown your beef. I tossed it into a pan and let it simmer while I got to work chopping my veggies.

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Bonus shot of my pizza dough thawing on the pilot light.

Next step: cut up your veggies! This is also probably a good time to start heating your oven. I set mine to about 350°. Don’t forget to check on the meat periodically though. Here I chopped up some mushrooms and used my fancy shmancy garlic zoom (don’t judge, it was a wedding present) to get my stuff ready. I also had some extra time to chop up a few more vegetables for lunch time snacks.

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If you’re smarter than me, you’ll probably roll out your dough on a cutting board. I am not a smart man, so I greased up my cookie sheet, cut my dough ball in half, and started kneading it out with my fingers. It worked, but it could have turned out a lot better. In any case, get however many dough bits rolled out as you need and get them on your baking sheet to start filling them. When you start, you’ll want to keep in mind that you need to flip one half over so that all your ingredients are covered. I just tried to stick to filling one side of my dough. I chose to go sauce, cheese, meat, then veggies, and fold everything over. However you choose to do it is perfectly fine, just so long as you can fold over your dough and seal the edges.

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     Not pictured: well sealed edges.

Pop that bad boy into the oven for about 20 minutes, or until the crust is as toasty as you want it. Pull it out. Let it cool, and enjoy! I did thoroughly, because I never get to put that much garlic on anything and it was a nice treat for me. Not as much for my husband when I tried to kiss him later, but for me anyway, and that’s really the important part.

Hope you enjoyed my bored return to the kitchen!

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There is nothing more delicious than fresh noodles, sea food and fresh veggies on a cool spring night.

And if you’re economic like me, there’s nothing better than all of that on a single plate and in every delicious bite.

After a year of tweaking, I’ve finally found my perfect dish after trying a version of this soup in an instant noodle bowl that has since changed. (saddd faccceee)

I present to you…

Stinky Noodle Platter

Make at your own caution.

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Ingredients:

1 package of bonito flakes

1 kombu kelp

2 cups water

1 bottle clam juice

1 tbp sesame oil

1 tsp turmeric powder

5 raw shrimp

6 oz salmon fillet

2 bunches of bok choy, chopped

¼ cup grated daikon

1 tsp grated ginger

3 cloves of garlic, grated

½  onion

8 shitake mushroom, diced fine

½ zucchini, julienne fine

½ package of fresh noodles

Dash of salt and sugar to taste

Dash of mirin (sweet cooking sake) to taste

This recipe calls for a lot of prep work, but once you have that out of the way, you’re golden.

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Alright, to start – soak the kombu kelp in the water for a half hour, no heat.

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While waiting, cut the onion into bite size pieces.

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Cut the bok choy leaves into fine shreads.

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Grate the daikon.

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Dice the shitake mushrooms.

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By now, the kombu kelp has hydrated, so turn the heat on and let it come to a soft boil. Add the bonito flakes and set on medium low.

Back to veggies!

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Grate the garlic cloves.

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Charming to look at, huh?

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Grate the ginger.

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I’m a huge fan of keeping my station clean, so everything onto a plate or dish if you haven’t already.

Back to cutting!

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Cut the zucchini in half. Cut that piece in half.  Cut that half of a half (zucchini inception anyone?) into three pieces width wise. Cut that now length wise.

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Onto the plate it goes!

Now we can start cooking.

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Add the sesame oil to the largest pan you can find.

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Add the onions, garlic and ginger to the pan and sauté. Add salt and turmeric.

Why turmeric now?

Oils really bring out the flavor of spices better than any sort of heating or cooking method. If I added the turmeric later, I wouldn’t get as much flavor and I really love the taste of turmeric.

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Let this cook until a gorgeous golden caramel color.

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Let’s check on our bonito/kelp stock – it looks plenty disgusting, which means it is done.

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Add the rest of the vegetation to the pan and sauté until slightly softened.

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If you were a quitter, you would stop now and devour this pan.

But you’re not a quitter, are you? You know paradise is just a bit more away.

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Separate the stock from the solids, we won’t be using that (I mean, you can if you want, but I don’t).

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Add the claim juice.

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Add the sugar to taste (shut up, I like it a little sweet).

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Add the dash of mirin.

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Set to medium.

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After 10 or so minutes, I add a little bit of vegan butter (curse you lactose intolerance) for extra creaminess. You don’t have to, I just do.

Now, you could stop right here, add the noodles and be done with it. But we’re going full stop here.

Onto the seafood goodness!

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Peel the shrimp from their shells.

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I don’t mind the skin from the salmon (and it holds it together), so drop that right into the stock.

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Nestle that shrimp in there good.

Alright, I forgot to take pictures of this, but add the noodles straight into the broth once the shrimp and salmon are about down. It’ll take only a couple minutes and really thicken up the soup into a sauce.

Serve on a single plate with a nice garnish of black sesame seeds.

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Enjoy.

Fin.

Rating:

I’m still dreaming of the next time I can make this.

Now, this is a very flexible recipe – you can use whatever vegetables, spices and meat you want. You can make it spicy, you can add cheese, you can make it into a completely different taste. The choice is up to you.

Good luck!



{April 10, 2012}   Super Quick Deviled Eggs

Verdict: Om nom, nom nom nom.

So I was at my friend’s place with my husband, and our friend’s kids had done all their Easter egg coloring and had all these hardboiled eggs around that they were eating.  We’re outside in the garage and one of them comes outside and offers me one, darn near shoving it in my mouth for me.  I decided then that I wanted deviled eggs, and set out to make them as soon as I got home.  Like most of my recipes, this one doesn’t have a lot of instructions, but I’ll show you what I did.

What you’ll need to recreate what I did:
– 6 eggs

– Mayo – I used Miracle Whip

– Worcestershire sauce – I use Worcestershire like Betty White uses Frank’s Red Hot sauce.

– Some seasonings – I used salt, pepper, seasoning salt, and garlic powder, and of course topped everything with paprika.

Step 1: Put the eggs in a pot and fill with water to a bit above where the eggs are.  Different recipes call for different water heights, but I just wanted to make sure that there was enough water that the eggs could bounce around as they cooked and started floating.  Set the heat on high to get the water boiling, and boil for about 20 minutes or until they all start floating around.  I decided mine were done when I could tap on the top of each and it bounced up and down.

Step 2: Solitaire, TV, cleaning, Facebook, whatever you want to spend about 15 minutes doing.  Spend the last 5 keeping a good eye on your eggs.

Step 3: I put mine right into an ice bath to cool them down quickly so that I could get to work right away.  I left them in there long enough for the ice to melt, which I think was about 5 minutes or so.  In either case, once the ice is pretty well melted then you’re pretty well good to go for taking them out.

Step 4: Shell the eggs.  My mother informs me that the best way to do this is in the sink under cold running water, dropping the shells into a small strainer in a bowl.  The water helps the shells come right off, and the strainer keeps the shells all in one place so you can easily toss them out when you’re done.

Step 5: Once all the shells are off, you can now start cutting them in half.  If you counted right, you’ll notice that I lost an egg somewhere in here.  Turns out one of them had a small crack when I boiled it and was hard and rubbery and didn’t seem like it was going to taste right.  The rest turned out ok.  Remove the yolks from the whites and put them into a separate bowl.  I found that it was actually pretty easy to just squeeze the white to make the yolk just sort of pop on out.

Step 6: I took the knife I cut them in half with and broke the yolks up a lot. You can use a Slap Chop, cut them on a cutting board, whatever you want as long as the end result is the demolished yolk in a bowl.  Since we’re not making all that many, you’re going to be mostly using dollops, dashes, and pinches, but this is when you would add the spices and the mayo.  The consistency you want is totally up to you, more mayo gives it a creamier consistency and less makes it more like the yolk. Be sparing when adding everything together though, you can always add more but you can’t add less, and Worcestershire will also help thin it out some.  Mix it all together well, and once you have the consistency you like, start spooning the mix back into the egg whites.

Step 7: Garnish with paprika and enjoy!

This was the very first time I made deviled eggs by myself, and I was surprised at how easy it was to do just knowing basics.  I knew that I had to hardboil eggs, halve them, remove the yolks, turn the yolks into deliciousness, and scoop them back into the whites.  I know some people believe that you aren’t making it right if you don’t include specific ingredients, but to me it’s like guacamole; as long as you have the basics, it counts.  I may make it again with different ingredients to go for a different taste, but who knows.

If you have any questions or comments you can either leave them below, or email me.  If you have a suggestion for a recipe or any other ideas, that email address is theboredgirlskitchen@gmail.com.

Happy cooking!



{April 6, 2012}   Pot Fried Noodles

Verdict: Damned delicious

I like pasta a lot, but sometimes it can get old and boring.  Something that never seems to get old for me though is doctoring up elbow noodles.  So that’s what you’re seeing today!  I was initially going to make just enough for myself, but my friend came over and made himself busy cleaning out my fridge, so I decided to be nice and make a little extra so he could have a good lunch as payment for his hard work.

To make this you’ll need:

– Elbow noodles

– Various veggies – I used a can of green beans.  The more people you’re feeding, the more veggies you can add in.

– Various seasonings – I used garlic powder, salt, pepper, Worcestershire sauce, and the last of that steak seasoning you’ve seen me use the last few recipes.

– 1 tablespoon butter

– Cheese (completely optional)

Step 1: Cook the noodles.  Drain, and return to the pot.

Step 2: Add butter, stir noodles until butter is melted evenly. Add a low head, and add all of your seasonings and veggies and stir often enough to keep the noodles from burning. When you’re about ready to serve it, add a splash of Worcestershire sauce. You can see in the photo about how much I added.

Step 4: Garnish with cheese if you want, or just enjoy without it.  Tasty either way!

This is a quick and easy dish I usually whip up in some variety just about any time I’m making something and don’t know what kind of side to add.  It’s more exciting than plain noodles, and can be customized and catered to just about any palate. It was delicious with the cheese, it was delicious without the cheese.  The friend who enjoyed it with me said that it wasn’t something that you’d want to eat right before kissing anybody, but if you’re anything like me you don’t care because you just love garlic that much.

If you have any questions or comments you can either leave them below, or email me.  If you have a suggestion for a recipe or any other ideas, that email address is theboredgirlskitchen@gmail.com.

Happy cooking!



et cetera
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